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English has borrowed heavily from French ?

Yes, English has borrowed many words from French throughout its history. This is largely due to the fact that the Normans, who were originally Vikings from present-day Denmark and Norway, conquered England in 1066 and established a French-speaking ruling class. This led to a significant influx of French words into the English language, particularly in the areas of government, law, and the military. Additionally, the two languages have had a close relationship throughout history, with French being a major influence on the development of the English language.


OVER 10,000 ENGLISH WORDS COME FROM FRENCH. MANY OTHER COME FROM LATIN, THE LANGUAGE FROM WHICH FRENCH IS ORIGINATED.

There are many French words used in English, as English has borrowed heavily from French throughout its history. Some examples include:



  • Cul-de-sac (dead end street)

  • Rendezvous (a planned meeting

  • Façade (the front of a building)

  • Bureau (an office or desk)

  • Protégé (a person under the protection or patronage of another)

  • Menu (a list of dishes offered in a restaurant)

  • Déja vu (the feeling of having experienced something before)

  • Touché (acknowledgement of a hit in fencing or a clever point made in an argument)

  • Elite ( the best or most skilled members of a group)

  • Souvenir (a reminder of a past event)

  • Boutique (a small shop or business)

  • Cuisine (cooking or a type of food)

  • Resume (a summary of one's work experience)

  • Déja vu (the feeling of having experienced something before)

  • A la carte (offering individual items on a menu rather than a set meal)

  • Et cetera (and so forth)

  • Fiancé (a man to whom one is engaged to be married)

  • Femme fatale (a seductive and dangerous woman)

  • Chef (a professional cook)

  • Croissant (a type of pastry)